Archives: July 2010

Macabre kids’ book art by Gojin Ishihara

26 Jul 2010

Here is a collection of wonderfully weird illustrations by Gōjin Ishihara, whose work graced the pages of numerous kids' books in the 1970s. The first 16 images below appeared in the "Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters" (1972), which profiled supernatural creatures from Japanese legend. The other illustrations appeared in various educational and entertainment-oriented publications for children.

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Kappa (river imp), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Jorōgumo (lit. "whore spider"), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Kubire-oni (strangler demon), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Goujin Ishihara --
- Rokurokubi (long-necked woman), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Goujin Ishihara --
- Onmoraki (bird demon), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Nekomata (cat monster), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Tengu (bird-like demon), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Tenjō-sagari (ceiling dweller), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Enma Dai-Ō (King of Hell), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Kyūbi no kitsune (nine-tailed fox), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Baku (dream-eating chimera), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- YÅ«rei (ghost), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Yamasei (mountain sprite), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Goujin Ishihara --
- Rashōmon no oni (ogre of Rashōmon Gate), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Waira (mountain-dwelling chimera), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Nure-onna (snake woman), Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters, 1972

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Hell of Repetition (Illustrated Book of Hell, 1975)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Burning Hell (Illustrated Book of Hell, 1975)

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Demons of the Orient (The Complete Book of Demons, 1974)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- The appearance of Satan (The Complete Book of Demons, 1974)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Gorgon (Illustrated Book of World Monsters, 1973)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Aliens in ancient Japan (Mysteries of the World, 1970)

Illustration by Goujin Ishihara --
- Alien (Mysteries of the World, 1970)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Emergency Command 10-4 10-10 (sonosheet book, 1972)

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- Emergency Command 10-4 10-10 (sonosheet book, 1972)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Kaiketsu Lion-Maru (sonosheet book, 1972)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Kaiketsu Lion-Maru (sonosheet book, 1972)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Prehistoric man as modern-day baseball player (Prehistoric Man, 1970)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Prehistoric man as modern-day wrestler (Prehistoric Man, 1970)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Prehistoric man as modern-day security guard (Prehistoric Man, 1970)

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
- The secretary who spied for 18 years (from Spy Wars)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- World's biggest glutton (World's Greatest Wonders, 1971)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Precognition of plane crash (Mysteries of the Body, 1973)

Illustration by Gojin Ishihara --
- Nostradamus (Psychics of the World, 1974)

Illustration by Goujin Ishihara --
- Frozen planet (Year X: End of the World, 1975)

Illustration by Gōjin Ishihara --
Dark star gravity (Year X: End of the World, 1975)

[Link: Gōjin Fechi]

iDish for iPad

23 Jul 2010

While the iPad may or may not revolutionize the way we consume media, it does have the potential to enhance the way we eat.

iDish -- iDish --
"Let's start a new life with iDish"

Introducing iDish, a new concept by iPad enthusiast shiinaneko that transforms the device into a versatile dinner plate.

iDish -- iDish --
Ideal for sushi

To use the iPad as an iDish, simply perform a Google image search to find your dish of choice. For a nice selection of sushi dishes, try searching for "sashimi" and "dish" (刺身, 皿). Display and resize the image, and you are ready to eat.

iDish -- iDish --
Aji (horse mackerel) on iDish

The iPhone/iPod Touch can also be used as an iDish. The compact size is suitable for soy sauce or small servings of tofu.

iDish -- iDish --
iPhone as iDish

Of course, iDish is also suitable for cuisines other than Japanese.

iDish -- iDish --
Curry rice and shumai dumplings on iDish

The possibilities are endless.

[Link: shiinaneko]

The Japanese Tradition – Apologizing

21 Jul 2010

"Shazai (謝罪)" -- from "The Japanese Tradition" series of videos by Japan Culture Lab -- is a useful and entertaining guide to the art of apologetic bowing.


+ Video

The video provides techniques and tips for the entire spectrum of bows, from the commonplace shallow bow (for casual apologies) to the various forms of ojigi (for serious apologies) -- including the long ojigi (used when apologizing to the public for a scandal or product recall) and the perpetual ojigi (to express determination). Also explained is the kneeling bow (used predominantly by ninjas), the grovelling dogeza bow (used when you are unequivocally in the wrong, such as when "caught red-handed in an orgy of evil"), the momentous doge-fuse bow (for the ultimate apology), and the doge-umari bow (the final straw).

Floating point: Tokyo time-lapse

15 Jul 2010

"Floating point," the latest Tokyo time-lapse video by photographer Samuel Cockedey, features views of Rainbow Bridge, Shinagawa station, Ikebukuro, Ochanomizu, and Tsukishima.


+ Video

Gong – How To Stay Alive

14 Jul 2010


+ Video

Tokyo-based animation team Mood Magic created the video for "How To Stay Alive" by veteran psychedelic prog-rock band Gong (from the album "2032"). The animation is based on drawings by guitarist/frontman Daevid Allen.

Photos: Rice paddy art (2010)

13 Jul 2010

This year's selection of rice paddy art has begun to crop up in fields across Japan.

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Rice paddy art in Inakadate (Aomori prefecture) [photo]

Two historical figures -- the legendary warrior-monk Benkei (left) and the warrior Ushiwakamaru, a.k.a. Minamoto no Yoshitsune (right) -- have emerged in a pair of fields in the Aomori prefecture town of Inakadate. For nearly 20 years, the town has prided itself as home to Japan's finest rice crop art, which is created by carefully arranging different colors of rice plants in the field.

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Benkei (left) and Ushiwakamaru (right) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Benkei [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ushiwakamaru [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ushiwakamaru in late June [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
View of Ushiwakamaru at ground level [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ushiwakamaru [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Benkei [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
View of Benkei at ground level


+ Video of Inakadate rice paddy art (filmed in late June)

* * * * *

Here are a few more works of rice paddy art from other parts of Japan.

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Animals in Asahikawa (Hokkaido) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Animals in Asahikawa (Hokkaido) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Samurai Keiji Maeda in Yonezawa (Yamagata prefecture) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
View from top of Keiji Maeda's head [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Princess Okaiko, a local folklore figure, in the town of Shirataka (Yamagata prefecture) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Rice paddy art at Denpark in Anjo (Aichi prefecture) [via]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Rice paddy art at Sakakibara onsen (Mie prefecture) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ducks near Fukushimagata Lagoon Water Park (Niigata prefecture) [via]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ground level view of ducks near Fukushimagata Lagoon Water Park (Niigata prefecture) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Ducks near Fukushimagata Lagoon Water Park (Niigata prefecture) [via]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Buddhist sword dancer and Anpanman in the Mizusawa area (Iwate prefecture) [photo]

Rice paddy crop art in Japan, 2010 --
Anpanman in the Mizusawa area (Iwate prefecture) [photo]

More:
- Rice paddy art, 2009
- Time-lapse video of rice paddy art, 2008
- Rice paddy art harvest, 2007
- Rice paddy art, 2007

Chameleon vs. human (in super slow motion)

12 Jul 2010

Described as a "mixed martial arts match" between man and lizard, this super slow motion encounter captured by goomo, a Tokyo-based media production agency, shows a chameleon firing its tongue at the face of a human opponent.


+ Chameleon vs. human

The video is one in a series of 25 episodes that capture compelling moments in super slow motion. The other episodes -- which mostly fall somewhere between grotesque and mildly erotic -- include a shot of pudding dropped onto a prematurely bald head...


+ Prematurely bald head vs. pudding

...a swimsuit model in a champagne fight...


+ Swimsuit model vs. champagne

...a slap in the face...


+ Slap in the face

...and more.

[Via: Karapaia]

Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan

08 Jul 2010

In the 1930s, a new style of poster emerged that reflected the growing significance of the masses in Japanese society. These artistic posters borrowed elements from Western design and often incorporated bold slogans with political, economic and educational themes. Here are a few examples.

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Health Exercises for the People (Bureau of Postal Insurance, 1930)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Tohoku Area Famine Relief (Federation of Tokyo Area Proletarian Organizations, 1931)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
The 2nd Proletarian Art Grand Exhibition (Japan Proletarian Artists Federation, 1929)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Workers and Farmers Russian Art Exhibit (Japan Proletarian Art League, 1927)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Listen! Workers of All Nations! (1931)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Safety Leads to Efficiency (Labor Welfare Association, 1932)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Proletarian Art Institute (1930)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Poster for The Proletarian Graph Magazine (Proletarian News Company, 1929)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Indulging in Alcohol Ruins Your Health (Labor Welfare Association, 1932)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Harufusa Ohashi (Election Poster for Labor-Farmer Party, 1928)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Come, the Dawn of Mankind is Breaking (Farmers' Theater Performance, 1928)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
National Bonds for the Sino-Japanese War (Ministry of Finance, 1937)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
The Grand National Exhibition of Advancing Japan (City of Gifu, 1936)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Records of a Victory (Leftist Theater's 20th Performance, 1931)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
A Town With No Sun (Leftist Theater's 14th Performance, 1930)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
A Happy Worker Makes a Happy Home (Labor Welfare Association, 1932)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Rise, All Japanese Citizens (Imperial Rule Assistance Association, 1940)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
The Key to Harmony Is the Spirit of Mutual Help (Ehime Factory Improvement Committee, 1929)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
To Manchuria! (Ministry of Overseas Affairs, 1927)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Poster for Taishu [The Masses] Magazine (Taishusha, 1929)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Kusunoki Masashige Festival (Kenkoku Kai, 1931)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Mobilizing All Citizens and Organizations for the Nation (Industrial Guilds Central Committee, 1937)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Pay a Living Wage (Japan Textile Workers' Union, 1930)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Prevent Tuberculosis (Ministry of Home Affairs - Social Affairs Bureau, 1930)

Poster from 1930s Japan --
Clean Up Before Make Up (Labor Welfare Association, 1932)

[Source: "Japanese Posters and Handbills in the 1930s - Communication in Mass Society," published by National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, 2001]

Hifana – Hanabeam

06 Jul 2010

Japanese breakbeat duo Hifana have released a kaleidoscopic new video for "Hanabeam," from their forthcoming "24H" album.


+ Video